Advanced Power Generation Technology Forum

cleaner fuels for power and industry

APGTF Strategy 2014

Cleaner Fossil Power Generation in the 21st Century – Moving Forward

A technology strategy for carbon capture and storage. January 2014.

Available for download here.

Past Events

December 2016:

Workshop: Power generation (coal, gas, and biomass) under increasingly stringent emissions regulations, 6th December.

The presentations are now available to view and download from the CRF website.

October 2015:

Carbon Capture and Storage: What role for R&D in delivering cost-competitive CCS projects in the UK in the 2020's?

Click here for more information.

March 2014:

14th Annual APGTF Workshop 2014: 'The Role of Fossil Fuel Power Plant in Providing Flexible Generation'

The Agenda and presentations for the above Workshop are now available to view and download.

February 2013:

13th Annual APGTF Workshop 2013: 'Carbon Capture & Storage – a Showcase of UK Research & Development’

The Agenda and presentations for the above Workshop are now available to view and download.

March 2011:

2nd Knowledge Transfer Network Workshop on National Ambitions for Power Generation in the UK.

The Agenda and presentations for the above Workshop are now available to view and download.

 

IPA CCS Skills Study

In 2010, Doosan Babcock, in conjunction with the Industrial and Power Association (IPA), conducted an assessment of the economic benefits, employment possibilities and skills needs arising from a major global programme of carbon capture and storage (CCS). Download the IPA CCS Skills Study document.

Publications 2003

Documents

Order by : Name | Date | Hits [ Descendent ]

Report of International Technology Service Mission to USA & Canada Report of International Technology Service Mission to USA & Canada

Filesize: 802.07 kB

The consensus view among the world’s leading scientists is that climate change is occurring and that it is linked to increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere enhancing the natural “greenhouse effect”. Carbon dioxide (CO2) atmospheric concentrations increasing steadily since the Industrial Revolution. The combustion of fossil fuels is the most significant source of man-made CO2 is the most significant of these GHGs, with atmospheric concentrations increasing steadily since the Industrial Revolution. The combustion of fossil fuels is the most significant source of man-made CO2